Saturday, 21 February 2015

RIC putting people first

The recently-formed Ayrshire branch of the Radical Independence Campaign (RIC) is ramping-up its activities in the local area.

RIC seeks to encourage working class engagement in the political process.  During the recent Independence Referendum campaign, RIC was credited with adding thousands of people to the Electoral Register through carrying-out mass canvasses of mainly deprived areas in towns and cities across Scotland.

The organisation campaigns on the slogan ‘Another Scotland is possible’, arguing that an independent Scotland could reject the right-wing, pro-big business, capitalist agenda of UK political parties and, instead, introduce legislation that puts first the interests of the people.

Local campaigner Heather Anderson told the3towns.today, “Our strategy in North Ayrshire is political engagement.  We are aiming to maximise political participation, especially amongst deprived and traditionally apathetic groups.”

The local RIC’s first meeting was held recently in Dalry.  Ms Anderson said, “It was attended by a wide variety of people, including some from the most disadvantaged groups of all. 

“One woman gave a very moving talk about how she fell into drug use and why she believed politics had no relevance to her life. She now realises that if things are to change, people just like her have to participate in the political process.”

Already the Ayrshire RIC has held street stalls in Saltcoats and Largs, and has begun local canvassing to ensure people are registered to vote at May’s UK General Election.

Heather Anderson explained, “We are attempting to persuade those who normally don't engage with politics and politicians that it is important to make their voices heard.”

The group has also begun arranging a series of public meetings to be held across North Ayrshire, at which high-profile pro-independence and anti-austerity speakers will make the case for working-class engagement and explaining how Scots can take control of their lives by “building another type of Scotland where people come first”.

No comments:

Post a Comment